Original Hob Grates

Original hob grates were made from cast iron with hobs either side used for heating and cooking and were fitted into the chimney breast. Hob grates are often known as register grates, the difference being register grates have a register plate on the back to protect the back brickwork of the chimney, control emissions and airflow from the fire. Today “register grates” are popularly known as “hob grates” despite having the register plate on the back. The name “register grate” came because the original hob grate design with a register plate on the back was registered/ patented/ copyrighted.

Original hob grates were first used during the reigns of King George I – IV (1740-1830) and in the regency period (1811-1820) where prince regent ruled due to his father King George III’s sickness. Hob grates were popular during these periods as they were an effective way of cooking and heating at the same time. The two hobs either side of the grate allowed for plenty of room for cooking utensils and at the same time the fire would radiate heat into the room. Hob grates were used right up until the Edwardian period although the functionality of being able to cook on the hobs died out as new technologies became available. During the Edwardian period and Art Nouveau hob grates tended to have changed in style somewhat, the main difference being that they often had tiles placed in them.

Our huge range of original restored hob grates have been sourced from areas all over the United Kingdom. We have a variety of styles available from the Early Georgian period right up to the Late Victorian period restored professionally by our team of skilled craftsmen.

Please feel welcome to come down to the showroom and view our range of original restored hob grates and antique fireplaces. If you would like to arrange a viewing please call us before so we can make sure the fireplace is on display in the showroom.